10th Person From U.S Is Being Treated With Ebola, Patient To Be Flown In Saturday From Sierra Leone To The U.S.


A 10 th  person from the United States is being treated with Ebola, the Associated Press reported.

The surgeon is from Maryland and will be transferred this Saturday to Nebraska Medical Center.

Dr.

Martin Salia, 44 has caught the disease while in Sierra Leone.

Salia lives in Sierra Leone but is a U.S.

resident who works at a hospital in the West African country, report says.

There have been five other physicians in Sierra Leone who contracted the disease but have died.

The reports said although the hospital where Salia is working is not treating Ebola patients, he was working in other hospitals.

“I was trained as a Christian surgeon.

I firmly believe God wanted me to do this job.

It was a calling,” Salia was quoted as saying.

A physician and two nurses in the U.S who caught the disease have recovered, there was only one reported fatality in the U.S.

a man from Liberia who was visiting in Dallas.

His relatives have been cleared of the disease.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has said that new cases of Ebola virus appear to be on a downturn trend, Wall Street Journal reported.

WHO also said last week that the death toll in the countries mostly affected is nearly 5,000 with 13,241 cases.

The nations mostly affected were Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

 “Intense transmission in the three most affected countries demands widespread rigorous control measures,” the WHO said.

“Preparedness in unaffected neighboring countries is also critical.” Ebola causes high fever and internal bleeding.

The disease, which has a 21-day incubation period, spreads via bodily fluids and the bodies of its victims can be contagious.

There is no known cure for the Ebola virus, WHO web site described Ebola as a” severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat.

This is followed by vomiting, diarrhea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding.

 With this, WHO has recently asked the world leaders to look into and make a decision on the latest experimental therapies for testing to combat the disease.

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